A Dominion employee is in hiding following death threats from Trump supporters

  • Eric Coomer, security director for Dominion Voting Systems, is in hiding after being targeted by Trump-supporting conspiracy theorists.
  • President Trump and his allies have amplified false claims that Dominion Voting Systems, which makes voting machines and elections software, was involved in a scheme to steal the 2020 vote.
  • "It's terrifying," Coomer told the Associated Press. "I've worked in international elections in all sorts of post-conflict countries where election violence is real and people end up getting killed over it. And I feel that we're on the verge of it."
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The death threats won't stop when Donald Trump leaves office, an employee at an elections software company currently facing such threats, said Wednesday. Indeed, conspiracy theories the the president's stoked about an election he lost are likely to serve as grist for the once-and-future candidate and his millions of supporters for years to come.

"I do not think this goes away on January 20," Eric Coomer, security director for Dominion Voting Systems, told the Associated Press. "I think it will continue for a long time."

Critics of the president have long had to deal with threats from his supporters. Members of the media, deemed enemies of the people, have been targets of hate and, in 2018, pipe bombs.

In the wake of the November election, however, the targets have expanded to include Republican officials who certified the vote in their states, as well as employees at firms, such as Dominion, that manufactured voting machines and software used in some of the places that Trump lost. On Twitter, the outgoing president has promoted fringe extremists and their baseless allegations that Dominion was central to the plot to steal the election from Trump — but not, for unclear reasons, down-ballot Republicans.

The president's lawyers, including Rudy Giuliani and the since-axed Sidney Powell, cosigned those unfounded allegations at a press conference last month.

Christopher Krebs, former director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Agency, has called such claims "farcical." US Attorney General William Barr has also said he's seen no evidence of fraud that would overturn the results of the 2020 election.

Coomer, meanwhile, speaking to the AP from an undisclosed location and fearing for his life, said the death threats began soon after.

"For the first couple days it was your standard online Twitter threats, 'hang him, he's a traitor," Coomer told the AP. It escalated to phone calls and a handwritten letter delivered to his father.

"It's terrifying," Coomer said. "I've worked in international elections in all sorts of post-conflict countries where election violence is real and people end up getting killed over it. And I feel that we're on the verge of it."

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